Being Professionally Personable on Facebook

Social media, hmn, how do you use it?

Or, how many social media at first time?

I bet only few of them maintain on regular basis.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media

On the above pic, you can mention on so many social media.

Facebook, twitter, linkedin, flicker, etc.

Each social media has an unique purposes and target audience.

E.g. Facebook with tagline connecting and share.

This platform always use for many peoples to connect with all peoples, old friends, and many others.

It also share many activities on your daily life.

LinkedIn, for professional people who love to work and get a business friends.

Twitter, more simple and fast, for texting simple words and picture.

Let say, you have 10 social media.

Do you maintain it everyday?

I bet, no.

If yes, you will only maintain it without having a “real” life with peoples.

Remember, we are human on real life, not virtual assistant or something like in movie “pixel”.

Have you watch movie “pixel”.

It’s entertaining movie.

I remember about pacman and his author.

Yes, his author have a connection as a father and son.

But, when pacman come to real life, he can not think, just free and want to do anything.

Even pacman eat his author hand’s .

Funny but it has a lot of good story.

Okay, lets get back to this theme.

When you feel not free or can not express all of your abilities or “lion” in your heart, 20 years ago, you just did a writing on your diary, a personal note, or even write on wall.

But now, wow, it’s amazing on digital area.

You can write, share, and post anything you like.

You can write a happiest and sadness in real time, even from your smartphone.

Something that still on science fiction movie 15 years ago.

You can post had a great breakfast in morning, crazy work in afternoon, and meet with someone new in night.

You can be an angle and demon in one time.

Yes, you can, but remember, everything that you post on social media could read by your friends and someone who never know you.

In horror scene, someone can track your life, habit, and kidnapped you.

Yes, it’s happen.

So be wisely.

I am not ask you to stop, but more wisely and more controllable on your wall social media.

I am maintain some of social media for this website sharing.

But, on daily basis, I only focus on 3 social media – facebook, linkedin, and twitter.

It also have a different purposes.

I use facebook for friends sharing and accept everyone.

I use LinkedIn for business purposes and only accept specific person, limited.

I use twitter for simple and daily update.

Okay, lats see on company’s purposes.

Lately, company use it for social media marketing.

Almost all companies, small, big, new startup, old company, etc, use social media.

It could reduce budget on traditional marketing.

Also can improve the way to reach market share.

Of course, they use it for specific target market but some of them for all market.

Its up to them to use it.

Many of startup companies, succeed with this method.

They can grow more business and new customers.

They focus on target market that align with their business strategies.

Can we do that?

Yes, you can.

You can follow their strategies, using a social media wisely.

Of course, you don’t want your boss find you posting a night life everyday while in other side, you always late on coming to office and always late on giving a work.

Okay, you want to you facebook for express your personal life.

Why facebook?

Because facebook have so many member, more than one nations.

  1. Restricted list for friends and content to share. Using this feature for your first step.
  2. Using default privacy setting. Check your phone or web and you can find it.
  3. Targeting your sharing and post. Limit it so specific audience.

You can mention many thing, but the basic thing are:

  1. Behave on your social media. Yes, you can post everything, but remember “fire” could come if you post a bad habit or statement. There are so many cases that employees fired by boss due to bad post on social media or event office email.
  2. Think differently on what you post. Don’t always post everything every minutes. Yes, there are someone who can post a hundreds post a day. It’s a new record, but others would see it as a bad habit and can give a bad day.

Just remember, everything you share and post are reflect your personal and professional habit.

You can read another article, as follow.

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Source: http://www.ceo.com/flink/?lnk=https%3A%2F%2Fhbr.org%2F2015%2F08%2Fbeing-professionally-personable-on-facebook&id=329476

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Use your restricted list. Facebook automatically provides you with a “restricted” list: a list of people you are friends with, but who don’t get to see the content you’re only sharing with (good) friends. This is the answer to managing all those people who send you friend requests you feel like you have to accept (like your boss), but who you don’t actually want to privilege with the intimate details of your day-to-day life. A good rule of thumb is to put anyone you know professionally on your restricted list, so that you don’t share your friend updates with those people. (For step-by-step instructions on how to use the restricted list, see this post.)Create your own lists. In addition to the broad distinction between friends and the people on your restricted list, you can make lists that include specific people and have specific viewing permissions. I have a small list of people I call my “kid sharing friends”; they’re the only people who see photos or news about my kids, unless it’s a story that I think will be relevant to a wider audience. It’s not that I think my Facebook friends list is full of child predators; I just know that not everybody recognizes how utterly fascinating my children are. You can use the same approach to target other audiences: professional colleagues, co-workers in your company, best girlfriends, or fellow baseball enthusiasts.

Target each post. Whenever you’re posting to Facebook, get into the habit of thinking about who you want to share that content with. Facebook’s posting interface includes a little button right beside the “post” button, where you can choose to share a post with “public,” “friends” (i.e. everyone who isn’t on your restricted list”, “only me” (something you’re just recording for your personal reference). You can also use the “more options” button to choose one of the custom lists you’ve created, or even to name the specific people who should see this particular post. I generally make content “public” when it’s related to my professional interests, so that even people on my restricted list get to see my professional news and insights. The exciting details on what I ate for breakfast or how I am feeling about my hair are limited to my friends.

Classify your colleagues. One of the things that’s tricky about putting all your colleagues on your restricted list is that some of your colleagues are likely personal friends. When you get a friend request from a colleague, think about which category they fall into: someone you don’t want to know better (deny the request, or put them on the restricted list), someone you think of purely as a colleague (restricted list) or someone you are really, really close with (friend list). Just remember that if you have any co-workers on your un-restricted friend list, you’ll need to picture that person reading every single thing you share — so think twice before posting a gripe about your job.

“View as colleague.” A good way to audit the way your Facebook feed may look to your colleagues is to use Facebook’s “view as” feature. Go to your profile page (by clicking your name in the upper-left corner of your Facebook window) and then choose “view as” (from the menu under the three dots beside the “View Activity Button” at the bottom of your cover image). Choose one person who is on your restricted list, and see what your Facebook profile looks like to that person; do the same thing for someone on your un-restricted friend list. If you’re not comfortable with who is seeing what, tweak the past posts where you’ve over-shared (you can retroactively change the audience for any post, though you can’t ensure it hasn’t already been seen) and be more careful about what you share with which audience in the future.

Set aside times to review your friend requests. One problem with relying on the restricted list is that it makes accepting friend requests a slightly more complicated process. Instead of just accepting a friend request, you have to accept it, and then edit the lists that friend is on (if you’re planning to add someone to your restricted list). So you can’t just accept friend requests as they come in; you’ll need to aside aside some time every week or so when you can review incoming requests and decide who goes on which list.

Tweak your defaults. If you share to Facebook from your phone, check the default privacy settings on your photo uploads. Set the default to the narrowest audience you ever share pictures with; it’s better to accidentally share a post too narrowly than too widely.

Using all of these tactics can ensure you don’t accidentally overshare with colleagues — without denying yourself the pleasure of connecting with them and with your friends. Better yet, once you’ve done a good job of quarantining your personal content on Facebook, you can actually use it to keep in touch with the people you care about, without constantly worrying about the professional impact of each post. When you’re able to use the world’s largest social network for both professional and personal reasons, you’ll rediscover social media at its best: not as a platform for self-promotion, but as a platform for genuine human connection.

Source: http://www.ceo.com/flink/?lnk=https%3A%2F%2Fhbr.org%2F2015%2F08%2Fbeing-professionally-personable-on-facebook&id=329476

Author by Alexandra Samuel, 14 August, 2015.

Access on 22 August 2015.

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